The Language of Leadership

In this post Laura Reed looks at 5 of the characteristics that make a great leader. Did you know that we run a 2-day Leadership workshop? Our course will help develop your leadership qualities and turn potential characteristics into established skills.

Strong, effective leadership plays a vital role in business and in our personal lives. Some people seem to be born leaders, able to tackle any challenge and others seem to flock to them with little to no effort. So what makes our leaders effective? What characteristics do we recognize in them consciously or subconsciously that makes us willing to follow? What characteristics do we instinctively know to avoid? Effective leaders can mean the difference between a profitable business and a failing one. With high-pressure jobs, great responsibility often tests leaders and brings out the best (and the worst) of their personalities. The following five characteristics of an effective leader are only the beginning qualities that strong, effective leaders must exhibit.

Language of Leadership

1) Genuine Humility

It’s more than likely that at some point in your life you’ve worked for a jerk. You’ve had to deal with someone who is demanding and has unrealistic expectations. A poor leader is full of themselves, selfish or out for blood with no regard for those who have to follow in their wakes. Humility is the key to a leader’s success. A humble leader often takes the mentality of “leading to serve” – in other words, their position of leadership’s purpose is to do what is best for their underlings. Genuine humility is important, especially since so many people try to fake it. Fake humility with an underlying selfishness is easier and easier to spot. A fake humility can reduce productivity and severely impact the moral of a business. Read the rest of “The Language of Leadership”

Leadership vs. Management – What’s the difference?

We strongly believe that leadership & management go hand in hand. A good manager needs leadership skills to perform and a good leader is nothing without a strong grasp of management techniques.

However, the two are different concepts that are often muddled together as one. In this post I am going to look at what makes leadership & management different, and how they should be combined for the best of both worlds.

management-vs-leadership

The Role

Management is a formal role within a business. The manager is responsible for the employees who work for them and must set and monitor goals that meet the aim of the business.

There is no formal role for a leader. The best managers are natural leaders but often an employee in the team emerges as a leader. In this situation it is important that the manager works with them to help spread the management message. When a leader within a team turns against the manager, dissent can soon spread.

Natural leaders are often internally promoted when they display their leadership qualities. Businesses feel that it is easier to promote an employee who already has the support of their team than bring in a new manager. Read the rest of “Leadership vs. Management – What’s the difference?”

Don’t Forget the Importance of a Team Brief

In the 90s and 00s, holding team briefs was an essential part of a manager’s role and a regular feature of office life. Since the rise in popularity of cloud computing and remote working, briefings are much more likely to be done digitally – and opportunities are being missed by managers who have forgotten the benefits that a proper meeting can give the whole team.

A team brief is an opportunity to discuss issues and change from the very top of the business down to smaller issues within the team. The open nature of the meeting worries some managers, who feel that imparting information via email can save them time.

Regular face-to-face briefings with your teams are still important opportunities to check in, give and gather information and – most importantly – to gauge understanding.

Management training will teach you both time management and effective communication skills. In particular, taking a course in management skills for new managers will mean guidance in which methods of communication are more appropriate for the situation, to ensure the understanding and support of your team.

Read the rest of “Don’t Forget the Importance of a Team Brief”

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